“Hey, apparently they used to make inserts back in the 60’s too!”

I do love me some vintage Baseball!!

The feel of the card stock, the worn edges, the odd blemish or crease here and there – all part of card collecting history and all part of the charm! I used to get really hung up on card condition – certainly with modern cards you’d accept and expect mint condition, but with vintage I’ve mellowed over the years, and acknowledge that a bit of wear and tear is now par for the course with a small and fragile piece of cardboard over 50 years old!

But despite loving vintage Baseball cards the cost of getting hold of some of those classic cards prohibits me from collecting them. I know of a few vintage collectors out there who have been putting their sets together for years, and I have nothing but envy towards them! We’re talking complete sets from the late 50’s onwards here!! How cool is that?!?

For a long time I always assumed that when we talk about vintage cards we’re discussing the idea of the base set of 600+ cards, released over a period of time in the form of ‘series’. However with the release of recent sets of Topps Heritage, and last years Topps Archives, I started to become more aware of another facet to vintage Baseball cards that I hadn’t really looked into before – the vintage insert!

So I started to do a bit of research around the topic and came across this great article by David Hornish, on Old Baseball Cards (OBC) which is, as far as I can tell, pretty much the ‘Holy Grail’ if you have any interest in this area of vintage card collecting –

TOPPS INSERT, TEST AND SUPPLEMENTAL BASEBALL ISSUES 1949-1980

The level of detail that David goes into with this article is staggering and appears to leave pretty much no stone unturned when it comes to vintage inserts!

One of the best things about these cards is that they are relatively inexpensive when compared to some of the cards from the main set, particularly the star players. As you can see from David’s article, there are a load to choose from so here’s some of my favourites –

1962 Topps Stamps

For the philatelist in all of us!!

1964 Topps Giants

My favourite insert set from the era and just resurrected in 2013 Heritage

1965 Embossed

One of the oddest in the list but strangely striking

1969 Topps Deckle Edge

Another favourite of mine and incredibly cheap to pick up. Featured in the 2012 Topps Archives set as an extra insert

Many of you will be aware that these exist (and possible have many of the cards) but for those of you who don’t, and fancied picking up some vintage cards for pretty reasonable prices, then look no further than some of these sets!!

And my gratitude to David Hornish for all the meticulous research he’s done in putting his article together!

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2 thoughts on ““Hey, apparently they used to make inserts back in the 60’s too!”

  1. You know, the world of baseball card collecting can be a very small one at times. I’m the UK’s only member of OBC (at the moment!) and had the pleasure of meeting David Hornish for dinner right here in Glasgow several years back. David recently wrote a fantastic guide to the Topps company from 1938 to 1956. You can access it here: http://www.scribd.com/doc/126643197/The-Modern-Hobby-Guide-to-Topps-Chewing-Gum-1938-to-1956

    As far as old insert sets are concerned, they are definitely great fun to collect and can be pretty cheap!! In addition to the sets Andy mentioned there are the 1968 Topps Game set, and the 1970 & 1971 Topps Super sets. If you want more of a challenge though, there are also some rare ones. Check out the 1971 Greatest Moments set for example. Tough set, but really cool.

  2. Pingback: They Might Be Giants | The Wax Fantastic

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